Rianne Letschert: Conflict and Reconciliation

Rianne Letschert: Conflict and Reconciliation

Many characteristics can be used to describe Rianne Letschert. Smart, successful, pioneering, inspiring, and many others. After studying law at the University of Amsterdam and the University of Montpellier, she earned a PhD from Tilburg University with a thesis titled The impact of minority rights mechanisms (2005). She has then worked as a professor and conducted research in the field of international law and victimology. Highly praised in her field, she was recognized as “Top Female Role Model in Science” by her university and was also awarded an €800,000 grant from the Dutch Research Council (NWO Vidi) in 2015. Typically, victimology deals with ordinary crimes, but Rianne decided to look at it from another perspective. She focuses on the victims of mass human rights infringements, as well as the victims of genocides or attempted genocides. This interest brought her to the four corners of our planet. Conducting research in Congo, Cambodia, Cyprus and the Middle East, she works hard to understand and defend the victims of unrest and conflict. In the video above, Rianne points out that regardless of their contexts or location on the globe, all conflicts share one thing in common, the enormous human suffering, the damage that is inflicted upon victims, individuals and groups. Whether it is economical, sociological or physical, the suffering does not end once the conflict is over. It can continue, grow worse, and have an immense negative impact on people’s subsequent lives. This is why she works hard to bring justice and reparations to those impacted by such conflicts. Rianne’s accomplishments have brought her to the heights of the academic world. She was recently about to become the dean at the Law...
Ron Heeren : The New Dawn of Cancer Surgery

Ron Heeren : The New Dawn of Cancer Surgery

The possibility of a complete and detailed snapshot of your own molecular data and with this the key to unlock the door to personalized medicine at arm’s reach? Pioneer prof. dr. Ron Heeren, University professor at Maastricht University and key player in the Top Research Institute M4I (Maastricht MultiModal Molecular Imaging Institute) is at the forefront of technological breakthroughs in oncology, neurology and cardiovascular medicine. Heeren’s team is developing biomedical applications of Mass Spectroscopy Imaging (MSI), or in other words techniques to photograph molecules. These amazing new developments will for example unleash dramatic differences in the way we treat and diagnose cancer. A revolution in cancer treatment is coming. Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. The need for more precise and faster diagnosis and treatment is eminent. The current state of affairs of cancer diagnostics, in which it takes at least a month to reach a proper diagnosis before being able to start with treatment, is just not cutting it. Moreover, the current pathological screening standards often do not provide a surgeon with enough knowledge on the nature of the tumor they are about to operate on. The new revolutionary imaging techniques developed by Heeren are able to capture the endangered tumor tissue as well as the surroundings malignant tissue at a very early stage and more precisely than ever before. Amazingly, Heeren doesn’t only focus on the discovery aspects of his research; he also aims at quickly implementing these new techniques into clinical practice. He expects that these MSI techniques will be in place within operating rooms in the next 3 years. Imagine that, on-the-spot access...