Roos Vonk: Start making your own choices

Roos Vonk: Start making your own choices

Picture by: Linelle Deunk Roos Vonk is a professor of social psychology at Radboud University Nijmegen, a published author of several bestseller books, columnist, coach, and educator. In addition, she is dedicated to improving animal welfare and sustainability. She is not afraid to speak up for what she believes in, even if this has gotten her into trouble on a few occasions. She is an idealist, independent and free-thinking and that is exactly what she wants to put up for discussion during her TEDxMaastricht talk: “How free are your choices really?”. For many of us, living in the Netherlands or in Europe is a synonym to “being free”. Free to make our own choices, express our own thoughts and opinions, explore our talents and take full advantage of the chances life has to offer to us. It’s a constitutional right that is at the root of many of our behaviors and societal dynamics. We are autonomous individuals assumed to be competent to make their own choices. Sometimes our freedom of choice is threatened – for instance when politicians propose to raise the age at which we can retire or to put windmills in our back yard. Similar, when idealists suggest we should introduce a meat tax and incorporate the true societal costs of food and consumer goods into the retail price, this potentially affects our possible choices. Whenever this happens, we revolt: it would restrict our freedom and the privileges we have acquired. But how free are we really? Roos Vonk is here to wake us up and change our perspective on our personal freedom! Gonny Willems Licensee and curation  ©...
Edward Slingerland: Trying Not to Try: Early China, Modern Science and the Power of Spontaneity

Edward Slingerland: Trying Not to Try: Early China, Modern Science and the Power of Spontaneity

On 17 October we will welcome Edward Slingerland to the TEDxMaastricht stage, a Professor of Asian Studies, as well as adjunct in the departments of Psychology and Philosophy, at the University of British Columbia. He holds degrees in sinology and religious studies, and is the author of, most recently, ‘Trying Not to Try: Ancient China, Modern Science and the Power of Spontaneity” (2014). “Why is it always hard to fall asleep the night before an important meeting? Or be charming and relaxed on a first date? What is it about a politician who seems wooden or a comedian whose jokes fall flat or an athlete who chokes?” In all of these cases, striving seems to backfire. We’ve long been told that the way to achieve our goals is through careful reasoning and conscious effort. Can prof. dr. Slingerland change your perspective to stop trying? “Recent research suggests that many aspects of a satisfying life, such as happiness and spontaneity, are best pursued indirectly. The early Chinese philosophers knew this, and they wrote extensively about an effortless way of being in the world, which they called wu-wei (ooo-way). They believed it was the source of all success in life, and they developed various strategies for achieving it and hanging on to it.” How, though, can you try, not to try? Dr. Slingerland has combined his studies of early Chinese philosophy with cutting-edge research from modern cognitive science, evolutionary studies, and social psychology to explore why this paradox is real, why is exists, and how finding a way around it is the key to both social cooperation and personal success. facebook Twitter Instagram Youtube flikr...
Margo de Kock: Expressing Gratitude

Margo de Kock: Expressing Gratitude

Managing Director at the Ronald McDonald house Maastricht and self-described storyteller and connector, Margo de Kock, won the TEDxMaastricht 2016 Pitch Night with her compelling story about an encounter that changed her perspective on life. Margo was born in Maastricht in 1969, graduated from her studies in youth welfare work in 1991. Working with sick children has been a common thread throughout most of Margo’s career. She has worked as a pedagogue and play-therapist at the AZM/MUMC+ for over 10 year including one year as the manager of the children’s television channel, creating television broadcast for- and together with sick children. Since 2005 she started working at the Ronald McDonald house Maastricht, where she aims to create a warm and safe home away from home, close to the hospital, for families with a severely ill child. One of Margo’s favourite TEDtalks is the talk of Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor.   “The first TEDtalk I was very much impressed by is this talk from a neuroanatomist who experiences a severe stroke. This event reduces her from a brilliant brain scientist to a heavily disabled patient, while on the other side giving her an incredible deep spiritual insight” Out of more than 125 pitch applicants Margo’s story was voted as one of the two favourites by the 200 person strong crowd attending the TEDxMaastricht Pitch Night. The curation team of TEDxMaastricht was also very impressed and decided to grant Margo the opportunity to speak on our local TEDxMaastricht stage. Margo is excited to have won the opportunity to tell her full story at TEDxMaastricht 2016; “Speaking at a TED event has...